Sex during pregnancy

Sex during pregnancy

Sex during pregnancy

Sex during pregnancy

Until the delivery, most pregnant women having a “normal” pregnancy can continue having sex which is safe. You need to modify positions for your own comfort as your belly gets bigger. Generally it is not advised to do sexual intercourse if it detects certain significant complications with your pregnancy, including:

  • a history or threat of miscarriage
  • a history of pre-term labor (you’ve previously delivered a baby before 37 weeks) or signs indicating the risk of pre-term labor (such as premature uterine contractions)
  • unexplained vaginal bleeding, discharge, or cramping
  • leakage of amniotic fluid (the fluid that surrounds the baby)
  • placenta previa, a condition in which the placenta (the blood-rich structure that nourishes the baby) is situated down so low that it covers the cervix (the opening of the uterus)
  • incompetent cervix, a condition in which the cervix is weakened and dilates (opens) prematurely, raising the risk for miscarriage or premature delivery
  • multiple fetuses (you’re having twins, triplets, etc.)

Due to large number of disease during pregnancies like STD’s etc doctors advise not to go further as it affects the mother and child and will have bigger complications later on

All in Perspective

 

During pregnancy many things we have to take care which is unsafe and trying not to spend too much time wondering and worrying. When in you have any kind of feeling or doubt, if it seems like a bad idea, doesn’t need to be done right now, or might be risky, at least have a conversation with your doctor about it. He or she can likely help ease your mind and may even give you license to do something you never expected to be able to do until after your special delivery.

 

Until the delivery, most pregnant women having a “normal” pregnancy can continue having sex which is safe. You need to modify positions for your own comfort as your belly gets bigger. Generally it is not advised to do sexual intercourse if it detects certain significant complications with your pregnancy, including:

  • a history or threat of miscarriage
  • a history of pre-term labor (you’ve previously delivered a baby before 37 weeks) or signs indicating the risk of pre-term labor (such as premature uterine contractions)
  • unexplained vaginal bleeding, discharge, or cramping
  • leakage of amniotic fluid (the fluid that surrounds the baby)
  • placenta previa, a condition in which the placenta (the blood-rich structure that nourishes the baby) is situated down so low that it covers the cervix (the opening of the uterus)
  • incompetent cervix, a condition in which the cervix is weakened and dilates (opens) prematurely, raising the risk for miscarriage or premature delivery
  • multiple fetuses (you’re having twins, triplets, etc.)

Due to large number of disease during pregnancies like STD’s etc doctors advise not to go further as it affects the mother and child and will have bigger complications later on

All in Perspective

 

During pregnancy many things we have to take care which is unsafe and trying not to spend too much time wondering and worrying. When in you have any kind of feeling or doubt, if it seems like a bad idea, doesn’t need to be done right now, or might be risky, at least have a conversation with your doctor about it. He or she can likely help ease your mind and may even give you license to do something you never expected to be able to do until after your special delivery.

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